• TRAVEL NOTICE: Learn more about COVID-19
  • Write a Review
  • Boards
  • Log In
  • Find a Cruise
  • Deals
  • Excursions
  • More
You may also like
Dismiss
Countries That Require Visas for a Cruise
Countries That Require Visas for a Cruise
When Should You Get Your COVID-19 Test Before You Cruise? What You Need to Know About Pre-Cruise Testing
COVID-19 testing prior to the Stephen Taber cruise (Photo: Chris Gray Faust/Cruise Critic)

When Should You Get Your COVID-19 Test Before You Cruise? What You Need to Know About Pre-Cruise Testing

When Should You Get Your COVID-19 Test Before You Cruise? What You Need to Know About Pre-Cruise Testing
COVID-19 testing prior to the Stephen Taber cruise (Photo: Chris Gray Faust/Cruise Critic)
Cruise Critic
Staff
  • Facebook
  • Pinterest
  • Twitter

With the rise of the Delta variant, more cruise lines have begun requiring a COVID-19 test before you board your ship. This requirement is necessary to ensure safety onboard, yet its execution needs some advance planning.

Trust us. Between the Cruise Critic, we've taken more than a dozen COVID-19 tests before travelling -- and while we don't quite have it down to a science, we picked up a few tricks and tips along the way.

Here are our top tips for making sure you meet your testing requirements before you board.

Know who needs to get a test. This is the first thing you need to figure out. On some ships, only unvaccinated passengers -- mostly kids under 12 -- need to have a COVID-19 test. But as the Delta variant continues to spread, more lines are making a pre-cruise test a requirement for everybody, including fully vaccinated passengers. Make sure you know exactly who in your party needs to be tested, too. Don't be like the families on Disney Dream, who didn't know their kids needed a pre-board COVID test; as documented on social media, many were turned away at the dock.

(Cruise Critic is keeping a list of up-to-date requirements for testing and vaccination).

Featured Videos

Freedom Of The Seas Resumes Sailing With New Rules

Freedom Of The Seas Resumes Sailing With New Rules

Alaska 2021: Inside Passage Businesses Talk About A Devastating Season Without Cruise Tourists

Alaska 2021: Inside Passage Businesses Talk About A Devastating Season Without Cruise Tourists

LIVE Interview with Frank Del Rio, NCLH President and CEO, About Company's "Safe to Sail" Campaign

LIVE Interview with Frank Del Rio, NCLH President and CEO, About Company's "Safe to Sail" Campaign

Scrapped And Sold Cruise Ships We'll Miss (And 1 We Won't Have To!)

Scrapped And Sold Cruise Ships We'll Miss (And 1 We Won't Have To!)

Could One Year Without Cruises Turn Into Two? 3 Reasons We're Optimistic (And 1 Reason We're Not)

Could One Year Without Cruises Turn Into Two? 3 Reasons We're Optimistic (And 1 Reason We're Not)

Video Q&A With MSC Grandiosa's Hotel Director, Giuseppe Pane

Video Q&A With MSC Grandiosa's Hotel Director, Giuseppe Pane

Cruising In Maine During COVID-19, On the Only Ship Sailing in the U.S.

Cruising In Maine During COVID-19, On the Only Ship Sailing in the U.S.

Former Cruise Ship Captain Offers "Ghost Tours" of Empty Cruise Liners in South England

Former Cruise Ship Captain Offers "Ghost Tours" of Empty Cruise Liners in South England

Variety Cruises' Galileo, The First Eastern Mediterranean Cruise In The COVID Era

Variety Cruises' Galileo, The First Eastern Mediterranean Cruise In The COVID Era

Royal Caribbean Group Announces E-muster, Keyless Cabin Check-in And Other App Improvements

Royal Caribbean Group Announces E-muster, Keyless Cabin Check-in And Other App Improvements

Drone Footage Of MSC Grandiosa Docked In Genoa For First Sailing Since The COVID-19 Pandemic

Drone Footage Of MSC Grandiosa Docked In Genoa For First Sailing Since The COVID-19 Pandemic

COVID-19 Cruise Safety & Sanitizing Equipment On Variety Cruises' Galileo

COVID-19 Cruise Safety & Sanitizing Equipment On Variety Cruises' Galileo

Cruise Lovers Share: "Why We Can't Wait to Sail Again!"

Cruise Lovers Share: "Why We Can't Wait to Sail Again!"

MSC Cruises - Smart Future Of Guest Experiences

MSC Cruises - Smart Future Of Guest Experiences

Know when you need to get your test. This is crucial. Many cruise lines require you to have taken a COVID-19 test within 72 hours before you board, something that is changing to no more than two days for U.S. departures. Cruise lines are scrapping the hour requirement to make things easier: a two-day testing requirement means a voyage departing Saturday can have tests done as early as Thursday. A Sunday voyage could be tested as early as Friday. (We'll be back to this timing issue later, as what kind of test you're getting can make a big difference with when you should go).

Know what kind of COVID-19 test you need. Learn the lingo. A PCR molecular test generally needs to be sent out to a lab and takes slightly longer to get results, particularly if your area has a spike in cases. It also costs -- in some cases as much as £149 -- but note there is little way round this as most EU countries demand a "fit to fly" certificate as proof.

Rapid antigen or lateral flow tests are much faster and can give results in as little as 15 minutes. They are also free -- all you have to do is go to your local chemists and ask for a testing kit, follow the instructions and register your (hopefully) negative test with the government website. But note -- many cruise lines do not accept them (nor all countries as a condition of entry, for that matter). Read all that paperwork your cruise line sends you thoroughly so you know your options. Showing up with the wrong test will result in a denial of boarding for all members in your party.

Embarkation in Athens before Norwegian Jade (Photo/Adam Coulter)

Know if there are any country requirements. If you're traveling internationally, there are usually many more hoops to jump through, including a country-specific health form that must be completed pre-flight (Known as a Passenger Locator Form or PLF). You'll want to read these requirements very carefully; some countries require you to be fully vaccinated before you enter, while others will accept a negative COVID-19 test -- either a PCR or an antigen, depending on the country. It's also worth having your results on the NHS app to show at the airport as many countries do not accept the physical card you are given at vaccination. Make sure that any test you take corresponds with when you board the ship -- if you're spending a few days in the country ahead of time, you might find that the PCR test that you took to get into the country will have expired by the time you board the ship. In that case, you might be on your own to find a COVID-19 testing site in another country.

Adventure of the Seas COVID test

Know where you can get a test. Boots, Superdrug and independent chemists all dispense lateral flow testing kits for free. For a PCR test you will need to check online. Keep in mind that you might have to pay for a test, depending on your coverage; some insurers only pay for tests when you have symptoms and not for travel. You'll also want to find out what kind of test your provider offers, as well as what their typical turnaround time for results is. Many airports also have rapid testing.

And if you forget or run out of time, international airports are always a safe bet for travellers and in most cases, tests can be booked online well in advance of travel for that critical 72-hour window.

Test on the early side of your window. If you need a PCR test, take it toward the beginning of the three-day window so you maximize your chances of getting your test back in time. As we said above, when there's a COVID-19 surge locally, it's harder for labs to get results back quickly. Airport testing locations will offer the quickest turnaround for antigen and PCR testing, as those are geared specifically to travellers -- but that convenience will cost you.

An example of how this works in practice: For our Malta trip that boarded on a Monday with a Sunday night international flight, we got our Friday test back on Saturday evening within 46 or so hours after taking it, giving us reasonable assurance that we wouldn't end up arriving sick in another country.

Flying during the COVID-19 pandemic (Photo: Aaron Saunders/Cruise Critic)

Nail down an appointment. If you've left it to the last minute and no time slots are available, check back often, as people do cancel appointments, so you could luck into a spot. Also, log online early or late to make an appointment, as many chemists refresh appointments or open new ones while you sleep. You know what they say about the early bird.

Have a backup. Many major airports are offering on-site COVID tests; consider that option if a rapid test will suffice.

Stock up on home kits – but buy carefully. Shop around -- there are numerous providers, some of the best known are Randox, ZoomDoc and ProjectScreen -- but it's worth checking the official government list if you are flying back from an Amber or Red country and need a Day 2 or Day 8 test-to-release. Prices vary from £49 up to £179 depending on whether you have to drop off the results or take them to a Post Office or make a video call to prove you have taken the test. Also check TrustPilot or ask a friend -- that's how we chose found our Fit to Fly test.

Consider testing even if it's not a requirement. This is particularly important if you're traveling internationally. You don't want to end up in a situation where you arrive in a country and test positive, particularly if the country has strict quarantine rules (Malta, for example, did not require a test for vaccinated passengers, but Viking is advising all passengers to get one 72 hours before the trip, just so there are no unpleasant surprises).

Consider laying low after testing. It goes without saying that the window between when you test and when you board should not be a time to party hearty. While there is always some risk of getting sick when you get on a plane, the airlines and airports all have mask mandates. That bar or party or indoor family dinner you're going to probably does not. Don't think that a negative test on Wednesday means you're immune on Saturday.

Updated September 06, 2021

How was this article?

Featured News

1
Carnival Cruise Line Scraps Terminal-Based COVID-19 Testing Plans
5
Regent Seven Seas Becomes Latest Cruise Line to Resume Sailing
Want to cruise smarter?
Get expert advice, insider tips and more.
By proceeding, you agree to Cruise Critic’s Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.